Meet Paul

Housing Stories — September 5, 2018

Meet Paul

Paul had been working as a janitor when he suffered a series of debilitating health crises: seven heart attacks and three strokes within a relatively short period of time. He was in and out of hospitals and eventually lost his home in a converted shipping container in Sylmar.

6,756

unhoused Angelenos have a physical disability.

 

Newly homeless, Paul struggled to find an adequate place to sleep. His cat, Mojo, was a no-go for the vast majority of shelters in the Southland, which have strict rules barring emotional support animals. For Paul, the idea of separating from his cat was too devastating to contemplate. “Mojo keeps me going,” he explains.

Living without a home took a huge toll on his psyche. Paul fell into a depression while he was experiencing homelessness and attempted suicide multiple times.

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outreach teams, including medical and mental health professionals, are now connecting people living on the street to critical services and resources.

 

Thankfully, he was able to connect with mental health service providers after reaching out for help, and eventually found supportive housing through the LINC Housing Corporation.

7,448

homeless families and individuals have secured permanent housing and 10,330 have gotten into crisis, bridge, and interim housing because of funding from Measure H.

 

Today, Paul is in a much better place. He lives in the Mosaic Gardens supportive housing community in Pomona, and finally has the time and space to heal. “I’m trying,” he says. “That’s the main thing, I’m trying.” He loves to cook and he says his health has improved tremendously.

At first, Paul commuted long hours to visit his preferred doctor, which made it hard to rebuild stability. He recently found a doctor close to his new home, which is helping him get better settled and invest time in finding a job. Every day, he’s struggling—to stay healthy, to repair bonds with his family, to find employment, to work on his sense of self. But he’s got a renewed sense of hope. “From where I was to now, I’m a lot better off,” he says.