L.A. County   2018

Homeless Count

According to the latest count, homelessness across L.A. County is down 4%—the first drop in almost four years—but there are still 52,765 people sleeping on the streets or in temporary shelters.

L.A.’s voter-approved coordinated plan to end homelessness will continue to succeed as long as our elected leaders and neighbors stay committed to long-term solutions that take into account the diversity and differing needs of our region’s unhoused.

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Having a home means more than just a roof over your head on any given night—it means not having to worry about the cold and rain, or where to keep your most important belongings, like medication, identification, and family photos.

Every object on this page represents the items that unhoused people typically have to keep on their person at all times, and risk losing to a sweep or robbery at any given moment.

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What changed in 2018

Investments in proven strategies have reduced homelessness among veterans and other vulnerable populations, but an increase of the newly homeless shows that we must do more.

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-

-24

%

decrease in chronic homelessness

-

-40

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-

-40

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-

-21

%

decrease in homelessness among veterans

+

-26

%

increase in people who are newly homeless

+

-19

%

increase in people who are age 62 and older

What we’re doing
In May 2018, the L.A. County Board of Supervisors approved the annual Measure H homelessness strategies and funding plan along with a budget of $402 million. This vote represents the most comprehensive approach to ending homelessness that our county has ever undertaken.

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Homelessness by region

From the Antelope Valley to Malibu and everywhere in between, homelessness is a regional problem and we will only solve it with collective action and thoughtful, long-term solutions.

52725

Total homeless population across L.A. County

-

-36

%

Overall change in homelessness across L.A. County

35

%

Percentage of unsheltered homeless people in L.A. County

-15

%

Percentage of sheltered homeless people in L.A. County

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What’s working

The Coordinated Entry System connects homeless and unhoused people to the appropriate resources, no matter where they are in the county.

Los Angeles County

Antelope Valley

3,203

total people


-16%

decrease since 2017


942

chronically homeless people

-19%

decrease since 2017

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San Fernando Valley

7,478

total people


+4%

increase since 2017


1,886

chronically homeless people

-17%

decrease since 2017

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San Gabriel Valley

4,282

total people


+5%

increase since 2017


1,383

chronically homeless people

+12%

increase since 2017

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Central LA

14,218

total people


-4%

decrease since 2017


4,509

chronically homeless people

-13%

decrease since 2017

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West LA

4,401

total people


-19%

decrease since 2017


1,132

chronically homeless people

-38%

decrease since 2017

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South LA

8,343

total people


-8%

decrease since 2017


1,773

chronically homeless people

-34%

decrease since 2017

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East LA

4,569

total people


+1%

increase since 2017


890

chronically homeless people

+5%

increase since 2017

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South Bay Harbor

6,011

total people


+1%

increase since 2017


1,560

chronically homeless people

-22%

decrease since 2017

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Sheltered & Unsheltered

“Unsheltered” people sleep on the street, in a tent, in a vehicle, or in a public building. “Sheltered” people sleep somewhere temporary by design, like a homeless shelter or a motel.

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What’s working

Funding from Measure H has helped 7,448 homeless families and individuals secure permanent housing and get 13,524 people into crisis, bridge, and interim housing.

39356

unsheltered people

-

-38

%

decrease in unsheltered people

13329

sheltered people

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Chronic illness & disability

People with chronic illnesses and disabilities are significantly more likely to experience homelessness. Health care is expensive and many don’t qualify for federal disability payments.

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What’s working

As of June, there will be 36 outreach teams that include medical and mental health professionals connecting people living on the street to critical services and resources.

-

-4

%

decrease in unhoused people living with HIV/AIDS

-

-23

%

decrease in people with serious mental illnesses

2569

people with a developmental disability

6868

people with a physical disability

-40

-40

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Veterans

L.A. has the highest number of homeless service members in the nation. Veterans are more likely to struggle with PTSD and chronic physical disabilities stemming from injuries and are far more likely to be unsheltered.

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What’s working

Homeless veterans are likelier to require supportive housing. Since 2017, 2,122 new units of supportive housing have been approved countywide, with a goal of approving 10,000 new units by 2022.

3870

unhoused veterans countywide

-

-12

%

decrease in chronic homelessness among veterans

-

-40

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Families & Children

Families need housing that allows them to stay together, which not all shelters and supportive housing buildings can accommodate. Homeless families with children are also harder to identify and connect with resources.

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What’s working

Since July 2017, 7,710 people in families have successfully avoided homelessness with the help of rental and legal assistance.

8180

people in unhoused families

4934

people under 18

+

-38

%

increase in youth since 2017

-

-39

%

increase in young family members

-

5

%

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-

16

%

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Survivors of Gendered Violence

Domestic violence survivors have been one of the fastest rising homeless populations in recent years and there are also many unhoused survivors of sex trafficking, rape, and sexual abuse.

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What’s working

Rapid rehousing interventions provide financial assistance, job training, and child care to get people back into housing as quickly as possible.

3041

people who are homeless as a direct result of domestic violence

13334

people over 18 who have experienced domestic violence

-17

%

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-6

%

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5

%

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Transgender People

LGBT people, who sometimes have to escape abuse and discrimination from landlords, employers, and their own families, are vulnerable to homelessness. That’s especially true for Angelenos who identify as transgender.

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What’s working
Youth housing placements increased by 43% in 2017, while more than 350 new interim housing beds were added.

+

54

%

increase of homeless transgender people in the last year

889

transgender Angelenos without a home

-40

%

-40

%

-40

%
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What You Can Do

Ensuring solutions to end chronic homelessness will take more than righteous indignation or good intentions. To accomplish our goal, we must organize and act.

From trainings and phone bank sessions to neighbor-to-neighbor canvassing and house parties, we’re building the community-driven infrastructure that will ensure that we create the homes for our homeless neighbors.

Sign up and get more information about how you can channel your passion into action.

Get Involved

What Everyone In is doing

Most of L.A. residents support long-term solutions to end homelessness. But it will take organizing, monitoring, and perseverance to make sure the plan is being implemented fully and efficiently.

We’re keeping the public informed and holding elected officials accountable. You can help by joining us (sign up to the left).